Assessment 3: Water Falls.

Consists of found footage, mixed with found audio and audio I have collected myself.

Since antiquity, philosophers and artists have attempted to explain the relationship between sound and the visual. I also have a fascination with sound’s potential transformation. I question: is it possible to reconceptualise sound, reconfiguring people’s understanding of it to be something more than an auditory concept? What if sound could become visual? As with my previous work, I also consider Ferdinand de Saussure’s theory of Semiotics (Sign + Signified = Signifier). Marcel Duchamp draws attention to the idea that “one can look at seeing, one can’t hear hearing” (Kahn 1999)]. However, many contemporary artists have attempted to give sound a certain ‘objecthood’.This, arguably, allows us to physically look at hearing and sound.

Similarly, I have attempted to embody Water Falls with the concept of ‘viewing sound’, extending this further by incorporating my own experience of living with severe hearing loss. As a child, I was intensely visual, as much of my life was silent or accompanied by tinnitus. I recall how this was punctuated by the sounds of water—the loud dripping and splashing of a tap running, the crashing of the ocean, the sounds of a thunderstorm. These were times of heightened sensation—I could hear, but I also felt as though I could see these sounds. The sight of water running down a drainpipe was the sounds of rain.In this work, the sounds and the images often don’t much up—the sequences are non-linear and disconnected, like memories often are, however, the sounds and images seem to flow naturally regards of their original purposes—like the narrative of my own past.

In this work, the sounds and the images often don’t much up—the sequences are non-linear and disconnected, like memories often are, however, the sounds and images seem to flow naturally regards of their original purposes—like the narrative of my own past.

 

  • Barthes, R 1981, Camera Lucida, Hill and Wang, New York City.Kahn, D 1999, Noise, water, meat: a history of sound in the arts, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, London
  • Kahn, D 1997, “John Cage: Silence and Silencing”, The Musical Quarterly, Oxford University Press, Vol. 81, No. 4, pp. 556-598.
  • Kahn, D & Whitehead, G 1992, Wireless imagination: sound, radio, and the avant-garde, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, London.
  • Kahn, D 1999, Noise, Water, Meat: A history of Sound in the arts, The MIT Press, London, England.Kelly, C 2009, Cracked Media: The sound of Malfunction, The MIT Press, London, England.
  • Kelly, C 2001, SOUND: Documentary of Contemporary Art, Whitechapel Gallery, London and The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  • TED 2014, Michael Rubinstein: See invisible motion, hear silent sounds, online video, 14 November, TED Conferences, LLC, viewed 29 April 2017, http://www.ted.com/talks/michael_rubinstein_see_invisible_motion_hear_silent_sounds_cool_creepy_we_can_t_decide?language=en .
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